Another Florida Fiasco - Mercedes-Benz Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-26-2007, 10:18 AM Thread Starter
Will Moderate For Cigars
 
cmitch's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2005
Vehicle: 2002 ML320, 2005 S430 4MATIC, 2010 F150 Crew Cab
Location: City on the TN River
Posts: 10,691
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
(Thread Starter)
Another Florida Fiasco

And the Democrats said they wanted every vote to count! Yeah, right. Now they're alienating their own.

Democrats strip Florida of convention delegates for holding election too early

By NEDRA PICKLER

The Associated Press

August 25, 2007
»

Florida Democrats would forfeit their votes in selecting a presidential nominee unless they delay their state election by at least a week, the national party said in a stern action Saturday meant to discourage others from leapfrogging ahead to earlier dates.

The Florida party has 30 days to submit an alternative to its planned Jan. 29 primary or lose its 210 delegates to the nominating convention in Denver next summer.

The state party chairwoman, Karen Thurman, said she would confer with state officials about the ultimatum. 'It's going to be a difficult discussion,' she said, because Floridians are wary of having their votes taken away.

Elected officials in Florida have said they would consider legal action and a protest at the convention if the national party barred the state's delegates.

There is general agreement that the eventual nominee will seat Florida's delegates rather than allow a fight at a convention intended to show party unity. But the decision by the Democratic National Committee's rules panel could reduce Florida's influence because candidates may want to campaign in states where the votes are counted.

Florida party officials said they originally opposed the early primary date, which covers both the Democratic and Republican primaries. The Republican-controlled Legislature passed the change and the GOP governor signed it into law in an effort to give the state a more prominent voice in national politics.

But Florida Democratic leaders now are committed to the state-run election because voter participation would drop drastically if Democrats held an alternative contest.

Members of the DNC rules committee expressed skepticism that Florida Democrats did enough to stop the change and they approved the harshest penalty. Florida's representative on the panel, Allan Katz, was the only vote against the penalty.

Refusing to seat the delegates would set a 'terrible situation for Florida and a very bad situation for the Democratic Party,' Katz said.

Party rules say states cannot hold their 2008 primary contests before Feb. 5, except for Iowa on Jan. 14, Nevada on Jan. 19, New Hampshire on Jan. 22 and South Carolina on Jan. 29.

The calendar was designed to preserve the traditional role that Iowa and New Hampshire have played in selecting the nominee, while adding two states with more racial and geographic diversity to influential early slots.

Several DNC officials said before the vote that they wanted to take the strong action against Florida to discourage Michigan, New Hampshire and other states that were considering advancing their contests in violation of party rules.

Garry Shay, a rules committee member from California, said allowing Florida to move forward 'would open the door to chaos.'

DNC committee member Donna Brazile also argued for a strong penalty, saying, 'I hesitate to see what happens if we show somehow some wiggle room in our process.'

The shifting dates have added uncertainty to the presidential candidates' campaign plans with the first votes to be cast in less than five months.

Advisers to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has a wide lead in Florida polls, said she will go wherever elections are held. Sen. Barack Obama, who was campaigning in Miami on Saturday, said: 'The national party has a difficult task, which is to try to create some order out of chaos. My job is really not to speculate on how to make it all work. I'm a candidate, I'm like a player on the field. I shouldn't be setting up the rules.'

Campaigning in New Hampshire, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico Democrat said it is important that the leadoff roles of Iowa and New Hampshire 'not be usurped.'

'As a candidate, I just want to get this settled and just appeal to all parties to get their act together and have some definitive roles,' Richardson said. 'Let's have an orderly process instead of states trying to outdo each other.'

Florida's congressional delegation has raised the possibility of a voting rights investigation in response to the punishment.

National Democratic officials insist there is no legal basis to force the party to seat delegates in violation of its rules. Florida officials could not say what law the DNC would have violated or where the case could be pursued.

Jon Ausman, a DNC member from Florida, pleaded for a role in what could turn out to be a historic election, with the potential of the first woman, black or Hispanic nominee, even if the state were the 'black sheep' of the primary season.

'We're asking you for mercy, not judgment,' he told the rules committee meeting in a hotel conference room.

The party's action comes seven years after Florida was at the center of an unprecedented dispute over presidential vote counting. In 2000, the election between Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore was held up for a recount in Florida. The Supreme Court stopped the recount, and Bush won the state by 537 votes.

Terrie Brady, a DNC member who helped present Florida's case, said the party's denial of delegates disenfranchises voters. Rules committee members objected to the term, saying Florida's votes would be counted if they followed the rules.

'I find your use of the word disenfranchisement to be an overstatement,' said committee member David McDonald, who is from Washington state.

New Hampshire's secretary of state says he may move up the state's primary, but for now the party has submitted a plan for Jan. 22, with the notation that the date is subject to change. Michigan's Legislature has taken up a bill that would move its contest to Jan. 15, but the state party submitted a proposal that for now describes a caucus on Feb. 9.

Michigan Democratic Party chairman Mark Brewer said he hopes the ruling against Florida keeps the DNC calendar in place. 'If it doesn't, we're going to move,' he said.-AP

I've Got an idea that'll stop all this shit. Hold all primary elections of BOTH parties in every state on the same day. That'll stop all this cross over voting and put an end to things like this.

2005 S430 4Matic 'Morton' W220.183 722.671 Rest in Peace

Bells and whistles are thorns and thistles.
cmitch is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-26-2007, 11:07 AM
BenzWorld Elite
 
mcbear's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2004
Vehicle: E500Es
Location: The BlueGrass State
Posts: 29,579
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmitch
And the Democrats said they wanted every vote to count! Yeah, right. Now they're alienating their own.

Democrats strip Florida of convention delegates for holding election too early

By NEDRA PICKLER

The Associated Press

August 25, 2007
»

Florida Democrats would forfeit their votes in selecting a presidential nominee unless they delay their state election by at least a week, the national party said in a stern action Saturday meant to discourage others from leapfrogging ahead to earlier dates.

The Florida party has 30 days to submit an alternative to its planned Jan. 29 primary or lose its 210 delegates to the nominating convention in Denver next summer.

The state party chairwoman, Karen Thurman, said she would confer with state officials about the ultimatum. 'It's going to be a difficult discussion,' she said, because Floridians are wary of having their votes taken away.

Elected officials in Florida have said they would consider legal action and a protest at the convention if the national party barred the state's delegates.

There is general agreement that the eventual nominee will seat Florida's delegates rather than allow a fight at a convention intended to show party unity. But the decision by the Democratic National Committee's rules panel could reduce Florida's influence because candidates may want to campaign in states where the votes are counted.

Florida party officials said they originally opposed the early primary date, which covers both the Democratic and Republican primaries. The Republican-controlled Legislature passed the change and the GOP governor signed it into law in an effort to give the state a more prominent voice in national politics.

But Florida Democratic leaders now are committed to the state-run election because voter participation would drop drastically if Democrats held an alternative contest.

Members of the DNC rules committee expressed skepticism that Florida Democrats did enough to stop the change and they approved the harshest penalty. Florida's representative on the panel, Allan Katz, was the only vote against the penalty.

Refusing to seat the delegates would set a 'terrible situation for Florida and a very bad situation for the Democratic Party,' Katz said.

Party rules say states cannot hold their 2008 primary contests before Feb. 5, except for Iowa on Jan. 14, Nevada on Jan. 19, New Hampshire on Jan. 22 and South Carolina on Jan. 29.

The calendar was designed to preserve the traditional role that Iowa and New Hampshire have played in selecting the nominee, while adding two states with more racial and geographic diversity to influential early slots.

Several DNC officials said before the vote that they wanted to take the strong action against Florida to discourage Michigan, New Hampshire and other states that were considering advancing their contests in violation of party rules.

Garry Shay, a rules committee member from California, said allowing Florida to move forward 'would open the door to chaos.'

DNC committee member Donna Brazile also argued for a strong penalty, saying, 'I hesitate to see what happens if we show somehow some wiggle room in our process.'

The shifting dates have added uncertainty to the presidential candidates' campaign plans with the first votes to be cast in less than five months.

Advisers to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has a wide lead in Florida polls, said she will go wherever elections are held. Sen. Barack Obama, who was campaigning in Miami on Saturday, said: 'The national party has a difficult task, which is to try to create some order out of chaos. My job is really not to speculate on how to make it all work. I'm a candidate, I'm like a player on the field. I shouldn't be setting up the rules.'

Campaigning in New Hampshire, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico Democrat said it is important that the leadoff roles of Iowa and New Hampshire 'not be usurped.'

'As a candidate, I just want to get this settled and just appeal to all parties to get their act together and have some definitive roles,' Richardson said. 'Let's have an orderly process instead of states trying to outdo each other.'

Florida's congressional delegation has raised the possibility of a voting rights investigation in response to the punishment.

National Democratic officials insist there is no legal basis to force the party to seat delegates in violation of its rules. Florida officials could not say what law the DNC would have violated or where the case could be pursued.

Jon Ausman, a DNC member from Florida, pleaded for a role in what could turn out to be a historic election, with the potential of the first woman, black or Hispanic nominee, even if the state were the 'black sheep' of the primary season.

'We're asking you for mercy, not judgment,' he told the rules committee meeting in a hotel conference room.

The party's action comes seven years after Florida was at the center of an unprecedented dispute over presidential vote counting. In 2000, the election between Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore was held up for a recount in Florida. The Supreme Court stopped the recount, and Bush won the state by 537 votes.

Terrie Brady, a DNC member who helped present Florida's case, said the party's denial of delegates disenfranchises voters. Rules committee members objected to the term, saying Florida's votes would be counted if they followed the rules.

'I find your use of the word disenfranchisement to be an overstatement,' said committee member David McDonald, who is from Washington state.

New Hampshire's secretary of state says he may move up the state's primary, but for now the party has submitted a plan for Jan. 22, with the notation that the date is subject to change. Michigan's Legislature has taken up a bill that would move its contest to Jan. 15, but the state party submitted a proposal that for now describes a caucus on Feb. 9.

Michigan Democratic Party chairman Mark Brewer said he hopes the ruling against Florida keeps the DNC calendar in place. 'If it doesn't, we're going to move,' he said.-AP

I've Got an idea that'll stop all this shit. Hold all primary elections of BOTH parties in every state on the same day. That'll stop all this cross over voting and put an end to things like this.
"...Florida's votes would be counted if they followed the rules." Now how hard is that to understand, really?

The second idea to have all primaries on the same day would eliminate much of this media silliness. All early primaries do is allow some candidates to be the benefit of peer pressure "gosh, if Iowa thinks Burpy is a good candidate, he must be, I'll send my donation to Burpy. "

Burpy08 - He's a gas, gas, gas.

McBear,
Kentucky

Being smart is knowing the difference, in a sticky situation between a well delivered anecdote and a well delivered antidote - bear.
mcbear is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-26-2007, 11:09 AM
It Is What It Is, Dude
 
isthisdave's Avatar
 
Date registered: Mar 2006
Vehicle: 1978 107.024 RIP
Location: InTransition
Posts: 21,646
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmitch
And the Democrats said they wanted every vote to count! Yeah, right. Now they're alienating their own.

Democrats strip Florida of convention delegates for holding election too early

By NEDRA PICKLER

The Associated Press

August 25, 2007
»

Florida Democrats would forfeit their votes in selecting a presidential nominee unless they delay their state election by at least a week, the national party said in a stern action Saturday meant to discourage others from leapfrogging ahead to earlier dates.

The Florida party has 30 days to submit an alternative to its planned Jan. 29 primary or lose its 210 delegates to the nominating convention in Denver next summer.

The state party chairwoman, Karen Thurman, said she would confer with state officials about the ultimatum. 'It's going to be a difficult discussion,' she said, because Floridians are wary of having their votes taken away.

Elected officials in Florida have said they would consider legal action and a protest at the convention if the national party barred the state's delegates.

There is general agreement that the eventual nominee will seat Florida's delegates rather than allow a fight at a convention intended to show party unity. But the decision by the Democratic National Committee's rules panel could reduce Florida's influence because candidates may want to campaign in states where the votes are counted.

Florida party officials said they originally opposed the early primary date, which covers both the Democratic and Republican primaries. The Republican-controlled Legislature passed the change and the GOP governor signed it into law in an effort to give the state a more prominent voice in national politics.

But Florida Democratic leaders now are committed to the state-run election because voter participation would drop drastically if Democrats held an alternative contest.

Members of the DNC rules committee expressed skepticism that Florida Democrats did enough to stop the change and they approved the harshest penalty. Florida's representative on the panel, Allan Katz, was the only vote against the penalty.

Refusing to seat the delegates would set a 'terrible situation for Florida and a very bad situation for the Democratic Party,' Katz said.

Party rules say states cannot hold their 2008 primary contests before Feb. 5, except for Iowa on Jan. 14, Nevada on Jan. 19, New Hampshire on Jan. 22 and South Carolina on Jan. 29.

The calendar was designed to preserve the traditional role that Iowa and New Hampshire have played in selecting the nominee, while adding two states with more racial and geographic diversity to influential early slots.

Several DNC officials said before the vote that they wanted to take the strong action against Florida to discourage Michigan, New Hampshire and other states that were considering advancing their contests in violation of party rules.

Garry Shay, a rules committee member from California, said allowing Florida to move forward 'would open the door to chaos.'

DNC committee member Donna Brazile also argued for a strong penalty, saying, 'I hesitate to see what happens if we show somehow some wiggle room in our process.'

The shifting dates have added uncertainty to the presidential candidates' campaign plans with the first votes to be cast in less than five months.

Advisers to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has a wide lead in Florida polls, said she will go wherever elections are held. Sen. Barack Obama, who was campaigning in Miami on Saturday, said: 'The national party has a difficult task, which is to try to create some order out of chaos. My job is really not to speculate on how to make it all work. I'm a candidate, I'm like a player on the field. I shouldn't be setting up the rules.'

Campaigning in New Hampshire, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico Democrat said it is important that the leadoff roles of Iowa and New Hampshire 'not be usurped.'

'As a candidate, I just want to get this settled and just appeal to all parties to get their act together and have some definitive roles,' Richardson said. 'Let's have an orderly process instead of states trying to outdo each other.'

Florida's congressional delegation has raised the possibility of a voting rights investigation in response to the punishment.

National Democratic officials insist there is no legal basis to force the party to seat delegates in violation of its rules. Florida officials could not say what law the DNC would have violated or where the case could be pursued.

Jon Ausman, a DNC member from Florida, pleaded for a role in what could turn out to be a historic election, with the potential of the first woman, black or Hispanic nominee, even if the state were the 'black sheep' of the primary season.

'We're asking you for mercy, not judgment,' he told the rules committee meeting in a hotel conference room.

The party's action comes seven years after Florida was at the center of an unprecedented dispute over presidential vote counting. In 2000, the election between Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore was held up for a recount in Florida. The Supreme Court stopped the recount, and Bush won the state by 537 votes.

Terrie Brady, a DNC member who helped present Florida's case, said the party's denial of delegates disenfranchises voters. Rules committee members objected to the term, saying Florida's votes would be counted if they followed the rules.

'I find your use of the word disenfranchisement to be an overstatement,' said committee member David McDonald, who is from Washington state.

New Hampshire's secretary of state says he may move up the state's primary, but for now the party has submitted a plan for Jan. 22, with the notation that the date is subject to change. Michigan's Legislature has taken up a bill that would move its contest to Jan. 15, but the state party submitted a proposal that for now describes a caucus on Feb. 9.

Michigan Democratic Party chairman Mark Brewer said he hopes the ruling against Florida keeps the DNC calendar in place. 'If it doesn't, we're going to move,' he said.-AP

I've Got an idea that'll stop all this shit. Hold all primary elections of BOTH parties in every state on the same day. That'll stop all this cross over voting and put an end to things like this.

This is not a partisan issue, cmitch. This highlights the need for a more orderly primary procedure.

What we have now are various state and party entities acting no differently than the bargain shoppers at Walmart's Christmas sale. Elbowing their way to be the first in line.

All this has done is lengthen the campaign 'season' and raise the spector of voter fatigue and apathy.

Not to mention the increased pressure for more funds over a longer period of time.

The DNC has rules in place to keep these elections from creeping ever earlier. The powers that be in Florida chose to put their fellow Floridian's primary vote at risk.

Dave.
isthisdave is offline  
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-26-2007, 12:04 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
jdc1244's Avatar
 
Date registered: Jun 2003
Vehicle: 1991 300 SE
Location: Lakeland, Florida
Posts: 18,534
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
“Refusing to seat the delegates would set a 'terrible situation for Florida and a very bad situation for the Democratic Party,' Katz said.”

So what else is new?

I fail to see why the Republicans are concerned about 2008. If Senator Clinton is the nominee zero Republicans will vote for her, very few Independents, and even a good number of Democrats will vote Republican. Obama is also sure to loose the general election if he becomes the nominee. The combination of a weak candidate and the inability of the DNC to get its act together will ensure the White House stays in Republican hands in 2009.

To addition to Democratic incompetence on the national level you have the Florida Democrats: a state party in disarray for almost 20 years. They bungled the 2000 election and will certainly screw up next year somehow. This nonsense with the primary date is yet another example of the State party’s ineffectiveness.
jdc1244 is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-26-2007, 12:22 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
mcbear's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2004
Vehicle: E500Es
Location: The BlueGrass State
Posts: 29,579
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdc1244
“Refusing to seat the delegates would set a 'terrible situation for Florida and a very bad situation for the Democratic Party,' Katz said.”

So what else is new?

I fail to see why the Republicans are concerned about 2008. If Senator Clinton is the nominee zero Republicans will vote for her, very few Independents, and even a good number of Democrats will vote Republican. Obama is also sure to loose the general election if he becomes the nominee. The combination of a weak candidate and the inability of the DNC to get its act together will ensure the White House stays in Republican hands in 2009.
Hard to see that outcome. The pendulum has started its swing. All Bush and company have done is push it further, faster.

While I personally don't think Clinton would be the best choice from the Democratic slate, she would be hands down better than a continuation of the current course. While many Dems might not like her, they won't vote Republican. The Independants are a toss up but most are just as tired of the Economic and Foreign Policy failures and will most likely either stay away or vote against a "stay the course".

As for Obama, he has equal or better experience than many of the candidates offered. If the suggestion is that he can't get elected because he is Black, I think most will find that there are not that many Racists registered in the Democratic Party.

The wildcard is going to be 18-24 year olds. They have the specter of the DRAFT looming in their future and they see that as a direct effect of Bush's policies, depletion of the National Guard due to the Iraq quagmire and a continued Foreign Policy that destabilizes rather than stabilizes the world. Wonder which way they will vote?

McBear,
Kentucky

Being smart is knowing the difference, in a sticky situation between a well delivered anecdote and a well delivered antidote - bear.
mcbear is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-26-2007, 01:28 PM Thread Starter
Will Moderate For Cigars
 
cmitch's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2005
Vehicle: 2002 ML320, 2005 S430 4MATIC, 2010 F150 Crew Cab
Location: City on the TN River
Posts: 10,691
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by isthisdave
This is not a partisan issue, cmitch. This highlights the need for a more orderly primary procedure.

What we have now are various state and party entities acting no differently than the bargain shoppers at Walmart's Christmas sale. Elbowing their way to be the first in line.

All this has done is lengthen the campaign 'season' and raise the spector of voter fatigue and apathy.

Not to mention the increased pressure for more funds over a longer period of time.

The DNC has rules in place to keep these elections from creeping ever earlier. The powers that be in Florida chose to put their fellow Floridian's primary vote at risk.

Dave.
No one is suggesting this is a 'partisan' issue. I am saying that if the Democrats hope to win the White House in '08, they are going to have to quit shitting where they're eating.

2005 S430 4Matic 'Morton' W220.183 722.671 Rest in Peace

Bells and whistles are thorns and thistles.
cmitch is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-27-2007, 05:24 AM
BenzWorld Elite
 
FeelTheLove's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: 83 Astral Silver 280 SL
Location: Planet Houston
Posts: 28,829
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
cmitch's concern for the well being of the Democratic Party is touching. Don't worry, honey, we're going to figure it all out on our own, you go back to your gay-bashing anti-Hispanic Katrina-fiasco Iraq-clusterfuck party and see how they are doing, mmm ..ok?
FeelTheLove is offline  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-27-2007, 07:42 AM
BenzWorld Elite
 
Jillian80's Avatar
 
Date registered: Dec 2004
Vehicle: DeLorean DMC-12
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 5,180
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcbear
The wildcard is going to be 18-24 year olds. They have the specter of the DRAFT looming in their future and they see that as a direct effect of Bush's policies, depletion of the National Guard due to the Iraq quagmire and a continued Foreign Policy that destabilizes rather than stabilizes the world. Wonder which way they will vote?

That's assuming the 18-24 year olds actually get off their asses and vote.
Jillian80 is offline  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-27-2007, 09:37 AM
BenzWorld Elite
 
mcbear's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2004
Vehicle: E500Es
Location: The BlueGrass State
Posts: 29,579
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jillian80
That's assuming the 18-24 year olds actually get off their asses and vote.
This time they have a stake in the game. And with equal rights, I think any new draft will have women signing up along with the guys.

Hope all the NeoCon DADs are proud of W's contribution to that part of their children's maturation process.

McBear,
Kentucky

Being smart is knowing the difference, in a sticky situation between a well delivered anecdote and a well delivered antidote - bear.
mcbear is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 08-27-2007, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
Will Moderate For Cigars
 
cmitch's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2005
Vehicle: 2002 ML320, 2005 S430 4MATIC, 2010 F150 Crew Cab
Location: City on the TN River
Posts: 10,691
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeelTheLove
cmitch's concern for the well being of the Democratic Party is touching. Don't worry, honey, we're going to figure it all out on our own, you go back to your gay-bashing anti-Hispanic Katrina-fiasco Iraq-clusterfuck party and see how they are doing, mmm ..ok?
And what have you done for your party besides spew all your left wing extreme babble that would send any decent democrat the other direction screaming?

2005 S430 4Matic 'Morton' W220.183 722.671 Rest in Peace

Bells and whistles are thorns and thistles.
cmitch is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Mercedes-Benz Forum > General Mercedes-Benz Forums > Off-Topic

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Mercedes-Benz Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











  • Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
     
    Thread Tools
    Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
    Email this Page Email this Page
    Display Modes
    Linear Mode Linear Mode



    Similar Threads
    Topic Author Forum Replies Last Post
    newbie blootooth fiasco protech Audio & Telematics Forum 1 09-18-2006 11:43 AM
    Fuel Filter Fiasco JamesDean W126 S,SE,SEC,SEL,SD,SDL Class 2 06-09-2005 10:56 PM
    W126 300SD fiasco w108 W126 S,SE,SEC,SEL,SD,SDL Class 2 06-14-2004 10:44 PM
    Radio Fiasco.... merouby W126 S,SE,SEC,SEL,SD,SDL Class 30 06-02-2004 12:07 PM
    Pictures from my driveshaft fiasco Tom Deckowski G-Class 17 01-02-2004 07:04 PM

    Posting Rules  
    You may post new threads
    You may post replies
    You may not post attachments
    You may not edit your posts

    BB code is On
    Smilies are On
    [IMG] code is On
    HTML code is Off
    Trackbacks are On
    Pingbacks are On
    Refbacks are On

     

    Title goes here

    close
    video goes here
    description goes here. Read Full Story
    For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome