More bad news from Iraq - Mercedes-Benz Forum

 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-17-2007, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
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More bad news from Iraq

Iraqis: life is getting better
Marie Colvin
Iraqis: life is getting better-News-World-Iraq-TimesOnline

MOST Iraqis believe life is better for them now than it was under Saddam Hussein, according to a British opinion poll published today.

The survey of more than 5,000 Iraqis found the majority optimistic despite their suffering in sectarian violence since the American-led invasion four years ago this week.

One in four Iraqis has had a family member murdered, says the poll by Opinion Research Business. In Baghdad, the capital, one in four has had a relative kidnapped and one in three said members of their family had fled abroad. But when asked whether they preferred life under Saddam, the dictator who was executed last December, or under Nouri al-Maliki, the prime minister, most replied that things were better for them today.

Only 27% think there is a civil war in Iraq, compared with 61% who do not, according to the survey carried out last month.

Related Links
Resilient Iraqis ask what civil war?
Violence slashed as troop surge hits Baghdad

By a majority of two to one, Iraqis believe military operations now under way will disarm all militias. More than half say security will improve after a withdrawal of multinational forces.

Margaret Beckett, the foreign secretary, said the findings pointed to progress. “There is no widespread violence in the four southern provinces and the fact that the picture is more complex than the stereotype usually portrayed is reflected in today’s poll,” she said.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-17-2007, 09:13 PM
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Botnst, this is good news, should you be posting this on the France website???

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When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-17-2007, 09:19 PM
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Yes, how surprising, the occupiers ask them how they like things, and they say yessem boss. I wonder what they said when Saddam asked them how they liked things?
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-17-2007, 09:59 PM
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Yes, how surprising, the occupiers ask them how they like things, and they say yessem boss. I wonder what they said when Saddam asked them how they liked things?
Good one!
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-17-2007, 10:11 PM
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Yes, how surprising, the occupiers ask them how they like things, and they say yessem boss. I wonder what they said when Saddam asked them how they liked things?
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You are are starting to sound deranged.

Meanwhile, back in reality:

Hardened Hearts
A chat with an Iraqi journalist shows how hard it will be to win this war.


Web-exclusive commentary
By Eleanor Clift
Newsweek
Updated: 12:21 p.m. CT March 16, 2007
March 16, 2007 - “Do you hate America?” I asked Huda Ahmed, an Iraqi journalist who is a visiting fellow with the International Women’s Media Foundation (full disclosure: I serve as a co-chair of the group). “Yes,” she said without hesitation. “I hate your government, and I hate your military, but not your people. If you visited Iraq, we would welcome you.” She didn’t hate the military right away, she explained. That sentiment only crept in after the scandals—the pictures from Abu Ghraib, the houses bombed indiscriminately, the killing of innocent people. Her hostility toward the U.S. government took root much earlier, after the first gulf war when Saddam was left in place, then through more than a dozen years of punishing sanctions. “They hurt the people; they didn’t hurt Saddam,” she says, recalling the hardship. Families of five or six people would share one egg, each getting a bite. Medicines were so hard to come by that corruption took hold; you had to bribe the nurse before she would give a life-saving injection, Ahmed said.

Ahmed has a degree in languages from Baghdad University and worked as a translator for American reporters when the war got underway. She remembers being puzzled when they first told her to ask Iraqis whether they were Sunni or Shia. Why, she asked? As one of seven children in a Shiia family, she thought of herself as an Iraqi. She knew there were tensions, but nothing like what she sees today. “Maybe they didn’t want their children to marry (outside the faith), but they weren’t killing each other.” The sectarian divisions were ignited and inflamed by the U.S. invasion and its messy aftermath. Today Ahmed ducks questions about her ethnicity. “Iraqi Muslim,” she says, her dark eyes flashing. Then, later, after a vegetarian dinner and a tribute to her courage as a journalist, she offers up the hope framed as a joke that someday Sunnis and Shias will be known as one: “Sushi.”

Asked to identify the three biggest mistakes of the war, she easily rattles them off. Leaving the borders open so foreign fighters could come across at will; disbanding the Iraqi Army so soldiers had to beg for food (“the Iraqis are a dignified people,” she adds), and firing the Baathists, who ran the ministries. Without the Baathists, the ministries collapsed, and the Iraqi people lost basic services. Going without electricity for all but two hours a day is still a commonplace in Iraq, she says. “I don’t know what’s going to be left,” she says. “This is a country of two rivers—the Euphrates and the Tigris. If you saw them today, you will cry. There are bushes in the middle.” The two rivers flow from Turkey through Iraq, and the mud that accumulates must be dredged out. It’s one of the many things that have been neglected. “Nothing is rebuilt—no sewers, no electricity,” she says. “Where did all the money go? Your companies have sucked all the money.”

“What if we leave?” I asked her. “We will sort it out,” she replied. “We have been in war before. We’re not stupid. Things might get worse, but we would run out of excuses. We couldn’t blame the Americans anymore.” She wouldn’t want the Americans to leave right away—any exit should be gradual—but it’s time, she says.


Ahmed was working abroad as a translator in Libya before the U.S. invasion. She returned home in the fall of 2002 to help care for her ill father. Talk of war was in the air but she didn’t believe the U.S. government would liberate the Iraqi people. Everyday life was hard but there were no security worries. People could go to the markets and the cafes, and take their children to the park. “If you kept quiet about the government, you were OK. If you spoke out, you could disappear,” she said. When she learned in a phone call in the middle of the night that she had been awarded a fellowship in the United States, her mother cautioned her not to be overly enthusiastic “or you’ll get us all killed.” Ahmed was jumping up and down and shouting with joy, rousing her entire family who, because of the limited electricity, were all sleeping on the ground floor of their house in Baghdad.

It was a chance to get away from the violence and to try to understand the point of view of the American government toward Iraq and the Middle East beyond all the rhetoric about democracy. It took months to get her visa, but Ahmed is now in Boston taking courses at MIT and Harvard and doing an internship with WBUR, the public radio station. Her attitude toward the U.S. government has not changed, but her openness to American culture is boundless. She had just worked on a story about the ingredients of a Twinkie. She’d never heard of a Twinkie, but she tried it, and it reminded her of an Iranian sweet popular in Iraq. Loving American life will be easy for Ahmed; softening her views of U.S. political leaders is a harder sell.
Go figure Eleanor Clift gets his vote.
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-18-2007, 07:02 AM Thread Starter
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Go figure Eleanor Clift gets his vote.
Good one!!

And where did you find that French smily?
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-18-2007, 07:44 AM
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yes, looks like they are giving up: Excite News - 7 U.S. Troops Die in Iraq Violence NOT.keep drinking da koolaid.



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Last edited by mzsmbs; 03-18-2007 at 08:45 AM.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-18-2007, 08:45 AM
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alright, here is some good news: Excite News - U.S. Opens Ad-Hoc Clinic in Sadr City

but, 4 years into the war? so, sadr can do this all along and we just now get the idea? well, better late then never.



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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-18-2007, 12:07 PM
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Good post! Bad news to our enemies--here and elsewhere...

Don't believe everything you think
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