Pluralism in Indonesia - Mercedes-Benz Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-29-2006, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
BenzWorld Elite
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: 95 E300
Location: Inside my head
Posts: 36,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 392 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Pluralism in Indonesia

For some reason I cannot get this Op/Ed article to download. If somebody else can, could you post it here so I can read it?

Thanks,

Bot

http://www.thejakartapost.com/detail...229.M10&irec=9
Botnst is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-29-2006, 10:41 PM
~BANNED~
 
Jakarta Expat's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2006
Vehicle: PM me to Join the Expat Muslims for Obama Club........
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 17,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Here you go Bot, my opinion it is just more rhetoric from an ineffective and useless newspaper.

Freedom of religion remains major challenge for country
Dadi Darmadi, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Indonesia is often called the world's third largest democracy. You wonder: People in this country should be able to practice their religion freely, shouldn't they? Not really. Not in our recent memory, with unforgettable flashing images of religious persecution and fiery politics: burned churches, vandalized mosques and angry mobs pelting worshipers. Religious harmony and dialog, anyone?

Indonesia has taken a long and winding road to freedom and democracy. The state has endured but the self-proclaimed nation, with its "imagined" religious harmony, is probably long, long gone. Sadly, reality bites -- at least given the current picture of religious harmony and freedom of religion here. Probably the biggest irony ever: In recent years, this once tolerant country has continuously been placed on a watch list by international monitoring groups for violating religious freedom.
In 2006, Indonesia was in the hot seat, again, with Nigeria, Egypt, Cuba, Belarus, Bangladesh and Afghanistan. So, are there reasons to believe that it still is worth addressing the issues and predicting the prospects of both religious harmony and freedom of religion in Indonesia in the next few years? Is there still hope for religious freedom here?
The prospect looks rather bleak indeed. In the last few years, or soon after the riots and conflicts broke out, both central and local governments were too busy with their domestic and cosmetic jobs. While social upheaval and riots were easily ignited -- and they were often not easy to handle -- the government has been too slow, too lenient in dealing with the perpetrators and the culprits behind the unrest. If this trend continues, we will witness one of the most glaring shortcomings in our social and religious life; when the government is too apathetic to address the social issues, while the citizens are too indifferent to the suffering of others. Some might suggest that this condition is already here.
The authorities have increasingly failed to prevent or punish criminal offenders. As a country that was hit by the worst of the economic crisis, and was once under harsh military rule, this kind of government attitude is shocking. But as Indonesia is also often hailed as a success story in the transition to democracy, this is just downright awful. This indifferent response is probably a political choice to achieve stability in national politics. But as anarchy at the street level continues to be tolerated, the privatization of crime on a larger scale is just a matter of time. The toxic residue of 30 years of official violence will continue to poison the legacy of "imagined" religious harmony we inherited from the previous order.
As if this was not bad enough, religious radicalism began taking root -- and continues to do so. The growing political power and influence of religious extremists has been followed by the imposition of religious-based laws in several regencies. The consequence? Pressure, harassment and intimidation by radical groups is rampant, while violence in the name of religion, as in the case of various extremist Islamic groups that often target fellow Muslims, has continued to increase. When the staunchest defenders of moderate and progressive Islam came under fire, the overwhelmingly silent majority hopelessly looked like jumping on the bandwagon with the staunchest defenders of God -- as they imagined they were.
In what might be a setback to already worsening religious harmony, a newly revised government regulation, signed by the minister of religious affairs and minister of home affairs, supposedly to make it easier to build houses of worship, was met with caution. Some minority groups continue to complain and share their concerns that the new rule is more a hindrance than a relief.
Unless the government keenly listens to the concerns of these groups on the margins, the new ruling will continue to restrict the construction and expansion of places of worship.
It is not surprising that, in August 2006, Indonesia fared quite badly on an index of the level of government and state intervention in religious affairs -- even compared with other states in Southeast Asia.
Another major issue is the state's failure to protect freedom of worship. Just a few months ago, members of the Ahmadiyah group had to flee in order to observe the Islamic holiday of Idul Fitri, while a few others prayed in isolated places.
Is this more evidence for those who are of the opinion that moderate Islam in this country is simply a myth? This is not encouraging at all for the general Muslim population, which often proudly assert themselves as practicing moderate Islam, let alone for the religious freedom for the whole nation. Have the lessons been learned from Maluku, Poso and other places? Last month, in Garut, West Java, an angry mob acting in the name of "preventing anarchic actions", demanded Ahmadiyah members demolish their mosque with their own hands.
This condition is sickening. Unless the government shows its political will to uphold the Constitution, the prospect of freedom of worship is bleak, from the top to the bottom.
With the arrest of Lia Aminuddin of Jakarta, the cult leader and Archangel Gabriel impersonator, and Yusman Roy of Malang, who was imprisoned for two years following his use of Indonesian when leading Muslim prayers, it is difficult to expect any major progress in the protection of all citizens, regardless of their views.
However, in times of crisis, things we often overlook are in fact positive signs of recovery. Early this year, in the conflict-ridden Maluku islands, several latupatis, local traditional chiefs, established a council to assist in reconciling the local Muslim and Christian communities, who were previously involved in a bloody conflict. It was also reported that some Catholic schools were reopened, and, overall, it was expected that peace in Maluku would gradually return. But for how long? We do not know. It is still too early to generate any definitive prediction that the costly conflict will not make a comeback. But these positive signs are definitely something to cherish, and part of the reasons that make us believe that things may change for the better.
It is also worth noting that in the last few months the government has courageously stepped up with stronger arguments in implementing effective law enforcement, and at times has come up with unpopular decisions. In rather surprising legal and political moves, the Poso Three -- Fabianus Tibo, Dominggus da Silva and Marinus Riwu -- were executed last September as they were found guilty by the court of inciting religious violence. Despite the outcry from many, including a written objection from the pope to President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, the government was firm enough to say that this was the product of the legal system.
Now the question is whether the government is also serious in upholding the law to bring the other culprits in Poso to justice, and execute the three main suspects of the Bali bombings -- Amrozi, Imam Samudra and Ali Gufron, who are on death row.
The government should combat criminal and violent acts emanating from both street level crimes and organized terrorist groups. The popular mandate and strong legitimacy of the Yudhoyono-Jusuf Kalla government should be used to strengthen law enforcement and religious freedom.
If this succeeds, the image and confidence of the government will be enormously improved. Religious leaders also need to take an assertive role in preventing religious tension. At this point, religious harmony is not merely a state affair; it is in fact everyone's responsibility, including religious leaders and their followers. At any rate, religion is about differences, and a religious conflict is often justified simply by these religious differences.
It is expected that, instead of relying heavily on state initiatives, informal and religious leaders, such as the local chiefs in Maluku, need to work hand in hand with the authorities in combating religious persecution in the name of the sacred and the social order. The leaders of major religious organizations, especially in urban areas, have continuously shown great interest in religious harmony. But if the government continues to deny these basic rights, there is no guarantee that there will not be more cases of blasphemy, heresy and religious persecution in the future. The writer is a researcher at the Center for the Study of Islam and Society (PPIM), a lecturer at Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN), Jakarta, and currently a PhD candidate in social anthropology at Harvard University, Massachusetts, the U.S.
Jakarta Expat is offline  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-29-2006, 11:30 PM
BNZ
BenzWorld Elite
 
BNZ's Avatar
 
Date registered: Jan 2006
Location: Ye Olde Siamese Rub n' Tuggery
Posts: 6,170
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 481 Post(s)
__________________





Hey JakXpat shouldn't you be stampeding in Mecca so you can post with 'Hajj' in your name ?
BNZ is offline  
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 12:32 AM
~BANNED~
 
Jakarta Expat's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2006
Vehicle: PM me to Join the Expat Muslims for Obama Club........
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 17,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
You only go to Mecca when you are ready for it. If you go and then come back and do evil things you will burn in a hell that is twice as hot. That is why my Mother-in-law refuses to go, God that bitch is a witch.
Jakarta Expat is offline  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 12:49 AM
~BANNED~
 
Jakarta Expat's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2006
Vehicle: PM me to Join the Expat Muslims for Obama Club........
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 17,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Although I do not plan on the trip to Mecca unless my insists I go with her, I have been a good Moslem this year like so many before. We have a day of sacrafice coming called in Indonesia Idul Adha. I will not explain the total meaning of this day but I have let Wikipedia do it for me below. We got back from Singapore on Thursday and once unpacked we set off to the local guy where we buy our sacraficial animals each year to donate to the Mosque. Now as the person donating you are allowed to ask for 1/3 of the meat back from the animal (Cows, Bulls, Buffalos and Goats) or animals you donated. The rest of the meat is passed out to the poorer people to at least have some protein in thier skimpy diet. We usually only ask for about 15 kilos of meat back as we will take it cut it up and package it in 1 kilo packs and give some over the next week to our Houseboy, gardner, pool guy, and a couple of guys doing odd jobs around. The rest we will freeze and give out during the year. It would make no sense to give it all away immediately as most do not even have a freezer in the small fridge in their small homes. This year we bought 2 cows, each weighed appx. 700 kgs each, not big heffiers but large for this part of the world. We had then delivered yesterday, 1 to 1 of 2 mosques in our neighborhood, that mosque is close by but is not supported by the rich in our neighboorhood and we 1 sent the other cow over to the mosque at my wife's mother's neighborhood across town. Officially they will sacrafice these animals on Sunday here and depending on the moon it could be either a day later or a day earlier where you are at, so gather the family, take your knife and go down to the local Mosque and help out your fellow brother.

.
Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى), or Eid-e Qurban (Persian: عید قربان) or (Turkish:Kurban Bayramı) occurs on the tenth day of the Islamic month of Dhul Hijja. It is one of two Eid festivals that Muslims celebrate. Eid ul-Adha is celebrated by Muslims worldwide as a commemoration of Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismael for Allah.Others celebrate Eid ul-Adha as it marks the end of the Pilgrimage or Hajj for the millions of Muslims who make the trip to Mecca each year. Like Eid ul-Fitr, Eid ul-Adha also begins with a short prayer followed by a khutba. In Mecca, the khutba is delivered at Mount Arafat.
It is celebrated on the 10th day of the month of Dhul Hijja (ذو الحجة) of the lunar Islamic calendar, after Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia. This happens to be approximately 70 days after the end of the month of Ramadan.
Eid ul-Adha is three days long starting the day after the pilgrims in hajj(annual pilgrimage to mecca by muslims world wide) desdend from mount Arafat. Men, women, and children are expected to dress in their finest clothing and perform prayer (Salaa) in a large congregation called as Eid Ghah(worshing place for Eid). Muslims who can afford to do so sacrifice best domestic animals, usually sheep, as a symbol of Ibrahim's sacrifice,any faulty animal scarifcation may not be acceptable by Allah(Quran,Hadith); this sacrifice is called "Qurban." The meat is equally distributed amongst themselves, their neighbours and relatives, and the poor and hungry. The regular charitable practices of the Muslim community are demonstrated during Eid ul-Adha by the concerted effort to see that no impoverished Muslim is left without sacrificial food during this day. Coming immediately after the Day of Mount Arafat when Muhammad pronounced the final seal on the religion of Islam, Eid ul-Adha gives concrete realization to what the Muslim community ethic means in practice. People in these days are expected to visit their relations, starting from their parents, then their families and friends.

Last edited by Jakarta Expat; 12-30-2006 at 12:51 AM.
Jakarta Expat is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 09:26 AM
Cruise Control
 
Zeitgeist's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: '87 300TD/'90 300D/'94 Quattro/'89 Vanagon TDI/'01 EV Weekender VR6
Location: Cascadia
Posts: 51,730
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Quoted: 1428 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
Houseboy?
Zeitgeist is offline  
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 11:26 AM
~BANNED~
 
Date registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 41,649
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Quoted: 1763 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeitgeist
Houseboy?

ding, ding, ding, ding...
Shane is offline  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 12:41 PM Thread Starter
BenzWorld Elite
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: 95 E300
Location: Inside my head
Posts: 36,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 392 Post(s)
(Thread Starter)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeitgeist
Houseboy?
Also known as a future revolutionary easily recruited from the ranks of the oppressed proletariat.

Yep, I mean exactly that.

B
Botnst is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 02:52 PM
~BANNED~
 
Jakarta Expat's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2006
Vehicle: PM me to Join the Expat Muslims for Obama Club........
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 17,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Yes "houseboy" Gentlemen, as opposed to a maid. I have a found with house staff in Jakarta, less is best. If you have a maid, she will make excuses about not wanting to do somethings because she is limited with her physical capabilities but in actual fact she just wants you to hire her a friend to talk to and play grab ass and after you have her trained up as how you want things her mother calls from the village and tells her to come home and get married to a boy her mother found for her, where as our houseboy is already maarried but his wife and kids live 9 hours by bus away and has been with me longer than my wife. He saw me when I was a real whore and had women running in and out at all hours of the day and night. I could leave and go to work at 0600 in the morning, leave work and go out the boys, pickup some loose woman and come back all drunk at 0100 or 0200 or even 0400 in the morning and he would be awake and opening the gate to the house to let me in, but all good things have to change and now that I am married he mostly does the menial work around the house. I mean all that we do not want to do. Like, make the beds, cleaning the house, and I mean top to bottom, bathrooms included every day, he does all the laundry that does not go to the cleaners, definitely all the laundry as my wife hates, literally hates to iron. As well as washing dishes, carrying in items from the car, running errands close to the house, going out and picking up food from places that do not deliver. Oh and did I menton he washes our cars to perfection every day by 0600 every morning, all clean inside and out and no matter if it rains every day for a week when we bring them back home they are sparkling the next morning. And when we take off to Singapore like a couple of weeks ago for a 10 day stay, he house sits, keeps the place clean and answers the door, turns on the house alarm at night and makes sure things stay as they are, he is honest as the day is long, not long on brains but then. Time off for him? He gets off from Friday night around 1800 to 0600 Monday morning once a month, the other 27 days he is here at the house taking care of us and doing his job. Of course Idul Adha is a special holiday as desrcibed above so he got off this weekend on Friday night and will come back Tuesday morning at 0600. Oh and the pay, he gets paid quite well as we only have 1 and I would rather pay 1 good than 2 average. For house staff of his capabilities he would get paid about 100 USD a month but we pay him the equivelent of USD 145 a month.
Jakarta Expat is offline  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-30-2006, 02:54 PM
~BANNED~
 
Jakarta Expat's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2006
Vehicle: PM me to Join the Expat Muslims for Obama Club........
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 17,697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Botnst
Also known as a future revolutionary easily recruited from the ranks of the oppressed proletariat.

Yep, I mean exactly that.

B
Oh Bot, you need to meet our revolutionary, he could not revolt against a fly.
Jakarta Expat is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Mercedes-Benz Forum > General Mercedes-Benz Forums > Off-Topic

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Mercedes-Benz Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











  • Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
     
    Thread Tools
    Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
    Email this Page Email this Page
    Display Modes
    Linear Mode Linear Mode



    Similar Threads
    Topic Author Forum Replies Last Post
    Don't Forget Indonesia GMISBEST. Off-Topic 13 05-29-2006 07:04 PM
    Hi from Jakarta - Indonesia wedha_mp W124 E,CE,D,TD Class 15 05-08-2005 10:16 AM
    Greetings from Jakarta, Indonesia tiger_biru W123 E,CE,D,CD,TD,TE Class 3 11-23-2004 08:11 AM
    Gs in Indonesia. rdabbous G-Class 1 04-29-2004 10:38 PM
    Lots of Gs in Indonesia Rabih G-Class 2 06-03-2002 11:02 AM

    Posting Rules  
    You may post new threads
    You may post replies
    You may not post attachments
    You may not edit your posts

    BB code is On
    Smilies are On
    [IMG] code is On
    HTML code is Off
    Trackbacks are On
    Pingbacks are On
    Refbacks are On

     

    Title goes here

    close
    video goes here
    description goes here. Read Full Story
    For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome