Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone - Mercedes-Benz Forum

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
BenzWorld Elite
 
Kerr's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2002
Vehicle: 02 G500
Location: Bristol VA / TN
Posts: 2,254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to Kerr Send a message via Yahoo to Kerr
(Thread Starter)
Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

So the wife and i got some bad news on friday. Our 2.5 year old Weimaraner has this. They say he has about 6 - 12 months to live is the average for a dog.

My question is this. Anyone else have a animal with this? Also does anyone do heart transplants on dogs?

Thanks
Shawn
Kerr is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 11:32 AM
BenzWorld Elite
 
tcp_ML500's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2002
Vehicle: C 111 Nardo
Location: Exiled
Posts: 9,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

Quote:
Kerr - 12/19/2005 10:26 AM
So the wife and i got some bad news on friday. Our 2.5 year old Weimaraner has this. They say he has about 6 - 12 months to live is the average for a dog.

My question is this. Anyone else have a animal with this? Also does anyone do heart transplants on dogs?

Thanks
Shawn
Saddly, you will have to resign yourself to get a new pup. Now woudl be a good time, the inevitable loss of the older one will be lessened if you have another to love and care for right now, and then!

You won't find anything suitable for anumal transplants, no infrastructure for donors, testing, etc... Unless you want to sacrifice someone else's?

I feel so miserable without you; its almost like having you here.
-- Stephen Bishop
tcp_ML500 is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
BenzWorld Elite
 
Kerr's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2002
Vehicle: 02 G500
Location: Bristol VA / TN
Posts: 2,254
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to Kerr Send a message via Yahoo to Kerr
(Thread Starter)
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

we have another dog, doberman who is 3. Just looking for other options.

Kerr is offline  
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 03:14 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
tcp_ML500's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2002
Vehicle: C 111 Nardo
Location: Exiled
Posts: 9,402
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

Quote:
Kerr - 12/19/2005 2:18 PM
we have another dog, doberman who is 3. Just looking for other options.
Well then...

Since the myopathy is well inscribed to the cardiac muscle, the rest of the dog is fine.

I suggest eating the dog sauteed in butter, with a vodka and cream sauce, possibly accompanied by spaetzle. The kidneys in a madere sauce, or flambés Ã* l'armagnac. Do right by the dog, sip on a Mouton Cadet.

I feel so miserable without you; its almost like having you here.
-- Stephen Bishop
tcp_ML500 is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 03:50 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
iNeon's Avatar
 
Date registered: Jan 2005
Vehicle: 2008 PT, 1998 neon--1965 VW 1200
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 2,533
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to iNeon Send a message via MSN to iNeon Send a message via Yahoo to iNeon
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

im sorry your pup is sick[:(] these lil beasties really make it easier sometimes, dont they?

its double-edged, though. they make it much worse when they go away. im not sure which i prefer.

dull, numb pain every single day or one big rush of intense sadness.

This signature removed to protect the innocent.
iNeon is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 08:58 PM
BenzWorld Member
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: 1986 300SDL
Location: Boston
Posts: 383
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

I have a cat with cardiomyopathy and have been treating him with Atenolol to slow down his heartbeat. He shows no ill effects of the disease although I don't expect him to live as long as a healthy cat.
I am somewhat philosophical about these matters, and appreciate every day with him. There is a trade off between medication and quality of life and the bottom line is that no matter what we do we tend to outlive our animals. I choose the least invasive path figuring that he would rather live 2-3 more comfortable years to 5-6 years of having medications jammed into him and extraordinary procedures performed.
One suggestion, have an echo-cardiogram performed to get a baseline for how large his heart is.
I'm lucky to live in Boston where we have a world class animal hospital (Angell Memorial).If you need some ideas drop me a line.
LK ONE is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 09:12 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
MBZER's Avatar
 
Date registered: Nov 2005
Vehicle: 560/sel/sec/Jag XJS
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,930
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

Kerr...

What is cardiomyopathy?

Cardiomyopathy is a serious disease in which the heart muscle becomes inflamed and doesn't work as well as it should. There may be multiple causes including viral infections.

Cardiomyopathy can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary cardiomyopathy can't be attributed to a specific cause, such as high blood pressure, heart valve disease, artery diseases or congenital heart defects. Secondary cardiomyopathy is due to specific causes. It's often associated with diseases involving other organs as well as the heart.

There are three main types of cardiomyopathy -- dilated, hypertrophic and restrictive.

What is dilated (congestive) cardiomyopathy?

This is the most common form. In it, the heart cavity is enlarged and stretched (cardiac dilation). The heart is weak and doesn't pump normally, and most patients develop congestive heart failure. Abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias and disturbances in the heart's electrical conduction also may occur.

Blood flows more slowly through an enlarged heart, so blood clots easily form. A blood clot that forms in an artery or the heart is called a thrombus. A clot that breaks free, circulates in the bloodstream and blocks a small blood vessel is called an embolus.

* Clots that stick to the inner lining of the heart are called mural thrombi.
* If the clot breaks off the right ventricle (pumping chamber), it can be carried into the pulmonary circulation in the lung, forming pulmonary emboli.
* Blood clots that form in the heart's left side may be dislodged and carried into the body's circulation to form cerebral emboli in the brain, renal emboli in the kidney, peripheral emboli or even coronary artery emboli.

A condition known as Barth syndrome, a rare and relatively unknown genetically linked cardiac disease, can cause dilated cardiomyopathy. This syndrome affects male children, usually during their first year of life. It can also be diagnosed later. (For more information on Barth syndrome, visit the Barth Syndrome Foundation at http://www.barthsyndrome.org.)

In these young patients the heart condition is often associated with changes in the skeletal muscles, short stature and an increased likelihood of catching bacterial infections. They also have neutropenia, which is a decrease in the number of white blood cells known as neutrophils. There are clinical signs of the cardiomyopathy in the newborn child or within the first months of life. These children also have metabolic and mitochondrial abnormalities.

How is dilated (congestive) cardiomyopathy treated?

A person with cardiomyopathy may suffer an embolus before any other symptom of cardiomyopathy appears. That's why anti-clotting (anticoagulant) drug therapy may be needed. Arrhythmias may require antiarrhythmic drugs. More rarely, "heart block" may develop, requiring an artificial pacemaker. Therapy for dilated cardiomyopathy is sometimes disappointing, however. If the person is young and otherwise healthy, and if the disease gets worse and worse, a heart transplant may be considered.

When cardiomyopathy results in a significantly enlarged heart, the mitral and tricuspid valves may not be able to close properly, resulting in murmurs. Blood pressure may increase because of increased sympathetic nerve activity. These nerves can also cause arteries to narrow. This mimics hypertensive heart disease (high blood pressure). That's why some people have high blood pressure readings. Because the blood pressure determines the heart's workload and oxygen needs, one treatment approach is to use vasodilators (drugs that "relax" the arteries). They lower blood pressure and thus the left ventricle's workload.

What is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

In this condition, the muscle mass of the left ventricle enlarges or "hypertrophies."

In one form of the disease, the wall (septum) between the two ventricles (pumping chamber) becomes enlarged and obstructs the blood flow from the left ventricle. The syndrome is known as hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (H.O.C.M.) or asymmetric septal hypertrophy (A.S.H.). It's also called idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (I.H.S.S.).

Besides obstructing blood flow, the thickened wall sometimes distorts one leaflet of the mitral valve, causing it to leak. In over half the cases, the disease is hereditary. Close blood relatives (parents, children or siblings) of such persons often have enlarged septums, although they may have no symptoms. This disease is most common in young adults.

In the other form of the disease, non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the enlarged muscle doesn't obstruct blood flow.

The symptoms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy include shortness of breath on exertion, dizziness, fainting and angina pectoris. (Angina is chest pain or discomfort caused by reduced blood supply to the heart muscle.) Some people have cardiac arrhythmias. These are abnormal heart rhythms that in some cases can lead to sudden death. The obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricle increases the ventricle's work, and a heart murmur may be heard.

How is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy treated?

The usual treatment involves taking a drug known as a beta blocker (such as propranolol) or a calcium channel blocker. If a person has an arrhythmia, an antiarrhythmic drug may also be used. Surgical treatment of the obstructive form is possible in some cases if the drug treatment fails.

Alcohol ablation is another nonsurgical treatment being developed for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. It involves injecting alcohol down a small branch of one of the heart arteries to the extra heart muscle. This destroys the extra heart muscle without having to cut it out surgically.

People undergoing this procedure usually suffer chest pain during the alcohol injection. The alcohol can also disrupt normal heart rhythms and require the insertion of a pacemaker. Alcohol ablation is a relatively new procedure being performed at only a few specialized centers in the United States. It's too soon to know whether this treatment will result in long-term benefit. It's still considered experimental.
MBZER is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 09:48 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
elau's Avatar
 
Date registered: Oct 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
RE: Dog, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated ? anyone

I once had a dog with cardiomyopathy. She was on medication, but I can't remeber the name. She lived for little over a year after the vet told us of her problem. I could hear her heart pumping when she laid on the floor while I watched TV. I felt so sorry for her. Good luck with your fur baby. I know how much they can capture your heart.

'95 R129
'04 G35.5 BS
'10 X204
elau is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-20-2005, 08:45 AM
BenzWorld Senior Member
 
Chuck V's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
yummmmmmm

Slow cooked in a crock with some potatoes, onions, garlic,and carrots is also very good. Helps to cut down on the gamey taste.
Chuck V is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Mercedes-Benz Forum > General Mercedes-Benz Forums > Off-Topic

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Mercedes-Benz Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











  • Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
     
    Thread Tools
    Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
    Email this Page Email this Page
    Display Modes
    Linear Mode Linear Mode



    Posting Rules  
    You may post new threads
    You may post replies
    You may not post attachments
    You may not edit your posts

    BB code is On
    Smilies are On
    [IMG] code is On
    HTML code is Off
    Trackbacks are On
    Pingbacks are On
    Refbacks are On

     

    Title goes here

    close
    video goes here
    description goes here. Read Full Story
    For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome