Is there a fish doctor in the house? - Page 5 - Mercedes-Benz Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #41 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-11-2005, 09:16 PM
BenzWorld Elite
 
iNeon's Avatar
 
Date registered: Jan 2005
Vehicle: 2008 PT, 1998 neon--1965 VW 1200
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 2,533
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to iNeon Send a message via MSN to iNeon Send a message via Yahoo to iNeon
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

feed cook boy in the middle more, hes a bit too skinny.

but you can tell him a boy on the internet thinks hes a nice hunk'a meat anyway[:p]

This signature removed to protect the innocent.
iNeon is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #42 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 09:09 AM
BenzWorld Senior Member
 
That Guy's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: '01 C320
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Quote:
jjl - 12/11/2005 9:39 PM

Quote:
iNeon - 12/12/2005 2:20 AM

jjl--

you ought to only need a heater and tank.

my salt tank doesnt even have a heater! just a backpack filter, about 10 pounds of live rock, half a bad of live sand a few hermit crabs and a clown fish=)

and a light so i can see them=)

ive become very lax in my tank maintenence of late, i swap filter carts and add water to them, but ive found my fish MUCH happier since i stopped fussing with them!

i think i want to shut the entire 55 down for a while, it has a pair of dempsies, a firemouth, two giant danios and a medium size pleco in it and its just filthy in the gravel. i live in a cave(my parents basement-- hows that to conjure up images of me, huh?) that has no water access and so i have to fill up a 5 gallon cubie in the bathtub and bring it down here, no way to run one of those luxurious faucet powered gravel vacuums down here or i would be on it so very quickly.

ive had a lot of luck with my aquaria and as you can see, got a little compulsive about it! such is life, i suppose!

a 20 long would be beautiful with some clowns and damsels in it for your first salt tank, you surely have the experience to make it successful!
I didn't realise it could be that easy - I had visions of yards of plumbing, UV filters, ozone generators etc (and cancel that MB engine rebuild)- I'm probably a victim of the equipment manufacturers' advertising. If I went with a 48 x 15 x 12 inch tank, with some reasonable filtration (canister filter) and a couple of strip lights, would that support (once matured a while) two or three clowns? How would you start it off - live rock, leave a while, one clown, leave a while, another clown, leave while? I would probably need a heater in this climate too (room temp drops to say 50 F occasionally).

BTW your basement sounds like me as a teenager - four aquariums and a miniature avairy (a mere six feet square) full of zebra finches in my bedroom. I also had some snakes in there - my sisters loved me.
JJL,

I'm with iNEON on this one. Heater, Protien Skimmer and live rock is all you should requirer to keep an easy to maintain marine environment. Don't forget the live rock. I kept a reef tank for about 3 years until my AC went on the fritz and my anemone found the circulation pump. Catastrophe. If you're looking at fish only tank heavy lighting is not required although you will want a 50/50 bulb (50% actinic/50% full spectrum) to keep the algae down. I'd recommend an initial complement of 10 pounds of live rock (dependent upon tank size) and then a final ratio of 1-1.5 pounds per gallon in the end. The skimmer is also key. Wet Drys work well but will introduce a lot of nitrates since they're very efficient for the first 2 stages of the nitrogen cycle but do nothing to degas the nitrates as nitrogen. If you want to keep corals you'll need at least 2 watts per gallon for soft corals (polyps, mushrooms, leather coral) and about 5 watts/gallon for hard corals. Power Compacts seem the way to go nowadays. I used to use VHO flourescents. Metal Halides are nice since they provide a point source of light.
I've read both the reef tank books by Sprung/Delbeek and I would recommend them if you're serious about salt. The hardest part about salt is knowing enough' to be successful. Maintaining a properly setup salt tank can be easier than a fresh one.
That Guy is offline  
post #43 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 09:48 AM
jjl
BenzWorld Extremist
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: 280SE 280CE 560SEL
Posts: 978
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Quote:
That Guy - 12/12/2005 4:09 PM

Quote:
jjl - 12/11/2005 9:39 PM

Quote:
iNeon - 12/12/2005 2:20 AM

jjl--

you ought to only need a heater and tank.

my salt tank doesnt even have a heater! just a backpack filter, about 10 pounds of live rock, half a bad of live sand a few hermit crabs and a clown fish=)

and a light so i can see them=)

ive become very lax in my tank maintenence of late, i swap filter carts and add water to them, but ive found my fish MUCH happier since i stopped fussing with them!

i think i want to shut the entire 55 down for a while, it has a pair of dempsies, a firemouth, two giant danios and a medium size pleco in it and its just filthy in the gravel. i live in a cave(my parents basement-- hows that to conjure up images of me, huh?) that has no water access and so i have to fill up a 5 gallon cubie in the bathtub and bring it down here, no way to run one of those luxurious faucet powered gravel vacuums down here or i would be on it so very quickly.

ive had a lot of luck with my aquaria and as you can see, got a little compulsive about it! such is life, i suppose!

a 20 long would be beautiful with some clowns and damsels in it for your first salt tank, you surely have the experience to make it successful!
I didn't realise it could be that easy - I had visions of yards of plumbing, UV filters, ozone generators etc (and cancel that MB engine rebuild)- I'm probably a victim of the equipment manufacturers' advertising. If I went with a 48 x 15 x 12 inch tank, with some reasonable filtration (canister filter) and a couple of strip lights, would that support (once matured a while) two or three clowns? How would you start it off - live rock, leave a while, one clown, leave a while, another clown, leave while? I would probably need a heater in this climate too (room temp drops to say 50 F occasionally).

BTW your basement sounds like me as a teenager - four aquariums and a miniature avairy (a mere six feet square) full of zebra finches in my bedroom. I also had some snakes in there - my sisters loved me.
JJL,

I'm with iNEON on this one. Heater, Protien Skimmer and live rock is all you should requirer to keep an easy to maintain marine environment. Don't forget the live rock. I kept a reef tank for about 3 years until my AC went on the fritz and my anemone found the circulation pump. Catastrophe. If you're looking at fish only tank heavy lighting is not required although you will want a 50/50 bulb (50% actinic/50% full spectrum) to keep the algae down. I'd recommend an initial complement of 10 pounds of live rock (dependent upon tank size) and then a final ratio of 1-1.5 pounds per gallon in the end. The skimmer is also key. Wet Drys work well but will introduce a lot of nitrates since they're very efficient for the first 2 stages of the nitrogen cycle but do nothing to degas the nitrates as nitrogen. If you want to keep corals you'll need at least 2 watts per gallon for soft corals (polyps, mushrooms, leather coral) and about 5 watts/gallon for hard corals. Power Compacts seem the way to go nowadays. I used to use VHO flourescents. Metal Halides are nice since they provide a point source of light.
I've read both the reef tank books by Sprung/Delbeek and I would recommend them if you're serious about salt. The hardest part about salt is knowing enough' to be successful. Maintaining a properly setup salt tank can be easier than a fresh one.
I can see I have a lot to learn here (not kidding), I'll follow up on those books and equipment pointers, thanks TG. As a beginner I'm inclined to start simply - I guess that means just live rock/sand, no corals and hardy fish (clowns & damsels)? Sorry to hear about the power cut, must have been a real bummer. A long time ago when I started fishkeeping one of the hazards was heaters sticking on and boiling the fish. As a kid I had no idea about the nitrogen cycle and the need for water changes; I ran my first tank for years just topping up with tapwater and I'm amazed that any of my poor fish survived - I even had a fairground goldfish in there (in the tropical tank) and he loved it.
jjl is offline  
post #44 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 10:15 AM
BenzWorld Senior Member
 
That Guy's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: '01 C320
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Damsels are probably the hardiest with clowns coming next. The problem with Damsels is they are great to start a tank out with, but can become surprisingly aggressive and territorial for their size once established. Blue Devil damsels are called that for a reason, and I had a Domino damsel that attacked a longnose butterfly (4X its size).
Also blue legged hermits and turbo snails galore will be best to have at the outset, preventing an algae bloom from taking hold.
That Guy is offline  
post #45 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 10:19 AM
worst mod in BW history
 
ThrillKill's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2005
Vehicle: ML CLK Iridescent Hyundai Accent lol,GoPed Freightshaker & Volvo semi's, c'mawn?
Location: Chicago
Posts: 27,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Quote:
Benz Devil - 12/12/2005 10:20 AM

Quote:
ThrillKill - 12/11/2005 8:13 PM


They are American actually. Made by Syracuse.
Here's a servers ass and two Mexicans.
Is your server cute?
I'm a good tipper.[:)]
Smokin! That shot did not come out well. She's got a nice little Badunk-a-dunk.

Back to fish:

I'm hesitant to make the saltwater jump myself but I really want a coral tank. The 75 gallon freshwater tank takes an entire day to clean properly and I also have a 10,000 gallon koi pond that takes up half my summer, although through bio-filtration and uv lighting I've cut maintenance in half.
I was always told to start a saltwater tank with cheap fish because chances are they will die before you get the water chemistry correct. Is this true?

ThrillKill is offline  
post #46 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 10:56 AM
BenzWorld Senior Member
 
That Guy's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: '01 C320
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Quote:
ThrillKill - 12/12/2005 12:19 PM

I'm hesitant to make the saltwater jump myself but I really want a coral tank. The 75 gallon freshwater tank takes an entire day to clean properly and I also have a 10,000 gallon koi pond that takes up half my summer, although through bio-filtration and uv lighting I've cut maintenance in half.
I was always told to start a saltwater tank with cheap fish because chances are they will die before you get the water chemistry correct. Is this true?
You don't' vacuum marine tanks or take everything out to clean them. They are largely hands off affairs. As far as maintenance, the only thing I would recommend is a 25% water change every 2-3 months. Filtered topoff water is also a necessity. That's about it once the tank is cycled. A 50% water change after cycling is a good idea. This is assuming you have a good enough skimmer and enough livee rock.

Why and how saltwater fish die is a mystery. It could be that they were drugged when caught, it could be that they weren't packaged well during their 15 or more hour transport from halfway across the world, it could be that their dietary requirements cannot be met in a captive environment, and it could be that you're water chemistry isn't correct. The best way to avoid these issues is to start your tank with uncured live rock and no fish. The rock will provide the ammonia through die off as well as the nitrifying bacteria so after a month or 2 the tank will be fully cycled and ready for fish. After that buying fish from a reputable source will limit the risks with unexplainable fish deaths. Also understanding what fish you are buying will help. Dragonettes (most popular is the Mandarin) will not live in an aquarium since they eat only copepods. They will quickly eat the entire population and then slowly starve to death, yet you see these fish on sale in stores regularly. Its these kinds of things that contribute to the bad rep for the hardiness of saltwater fish. You will often see tangs with hole in head disease and slowly wasting away because owners and some fish stores don't understand that they require algae (caulerpa not nuisance algae) to stay healthy and they are fed only brine shrimp.

As I said, knowledge is the hard part, putting that knowledge into practice isn't.
That Guy is offline  
post #47 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 11:03 AM
worst mod in BW history
 
ThrillKill's Avatar
 
Date registered: Apr 2005
Vehicle: ML CLK Iridescent Hyundai Accent lol,GoPed Freightshaker & Volvo semi's, c'mawn?
Location: Chicago
Posts: 27,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Quote:
That Guy - 12/12/2005 11:56 AM

Quote:
ThrillKill - 12/12/2005 12:19 PM

I'm hesitant to make the saltwater jump myself but I really want a coral tank. The 75 gallon freshwater tank takes an entire day to clean properly and I also have a 10,000 gallon koi pond that takes up half my summer, although through bio-filtration and uv lighting I've cut maintenance in half.
I was always told to start a saltwater tank with cheap fish because chances are they will die before you get the water chemistry correct. Is this true?
You don't' vacuum marine tanks or take everything out to clean them. They are largely hands off affairs. As far as maintenance, the only thing I would recommend is a 25% water change every 2-3 months. Filtered topoff water is also a necessity. That's about it once the tank is cycled. A 50% water change after cycling is a good idea. This is assuming you have a good enough skimmer and enough livee rock.

Why and how saltwater fish die is a mystery. It could be that they were drugged when caught, it could be that they weren't packaged well during their 15 or more hour transport from halfway across the world, it could be that their dietary requirements cannot be met in a captive environment, and it could be that you're water chemistry isn't correct. The best way to avoid these issues is to start your tank with uncured live rock and no fish. The rock will provide the ammonia through die off as well as the nitrifying bacteria so after a month or 2 the tank will be fully cycled and ready for fish. After that buying fish from a reputable source will limit the risks with unexplainable fish deaths. Also understanding what fish you are buying will help. Dragonettes (most popular is the Mandarin) will not live in an aquarium since they eat only copepods. They will quickly eat the entire population and then slowly starve to death, yet you see these fish on sale in stores regularly. Its these kinds of things that contribute to the bad rep for the hardiness of saltwater fish. You will often see tangs with hole in head disease and slowly wasting away because owners and some fish stores don't understand that they require algae (caulerpa not nuisance algae) to stay healthy and they are fed only brine shrimp.

As I said, knowledge is the hard part, putting that knowledge into practice isn't.
Thanks. Next question, Glass or lexan? I've heard that a lot of people have switched to plastic lately. My present glass tank is way heavy even without water and if I were to do a marine tank I would definately not want to go less than 150 gallons. Have they perfected plastic to the point where it is scratch resistant?

ThrillKill is offline  
post #48 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 12:45 PM
BenzWorld Senior Member
 
That Guy's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: '01 C320
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Quote:
ThrillKill - 12/12/2005 1:03 PM
Thanks. Next question, Glass or lexan? I've heard that a lot of people have switched to plastic lately. My present glass tank is way heavy even without water and if I were to do a marine tank I would definately not want to go less than 150 gallons. Have they perfected plastic to the point where it is scratch resistant?
I've always leaned toward glass although you have a point about weight. A 150 gallon tank will end up somewhere near 1500lbs all told. The majority of that weight is in water and rock though since water is about 7 pounds per gallon before adding salt. I'm not sure how the density of rock compares to that of water but I use 10lb gallon as a rull of thumb for a well stocked reef tank.

My only concern with' plastic is the scratching. With marine reef tanks you will get growth of coralline algae on the tank. This is a touch calcium based algae that is difficult to get off without using a flat metal edge. This has the potential to wreak havoc on a plastic surface. Not sure if they've gotten any better at preventing this.
That Guy is offline  
post #49 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-12-2005, 12:46 PM
BenzWorld Senior Member
 
That Guy's Avatar
 
Date registered: Sep 2004
Vehicle: '01 C320
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 564
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: Is there a fish doctor in the house?

Phantom posting sorry.
That Guy is offline  
post #50 of 54 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 01:30 AM Thread Starter
Boring Cars...meh!
 
Nutz 4 Benz's Avatar
 
Date registered: Aug 2005
Vehicle: 81 280E, 84 500SEC, 87 560, 89 "300E", 91 500SL, 15 E350 4Matic Estate, 71 BMW 2002, +others
Location: Maui
Posts: 15,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Lifetime Premium Member
Garage
(Thread Starter)
So I bought another betta........

and was wondering if I should not use the aquarium that the other betta died in??? Lost here [:I]The extent of my aquatic abilities are change the water and feed.So new aquarium ? I have been using a 10 gallon for the one that just died and he seemed to be
less stressed out when I put him in there 3 years ago.Thanks again.[8D]

http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c328/nutz4benz/W123/6C3A9CA5-EDFF-4834-8125-34B70B20A676_zpsiyesrawz.jpg
Nutz 4 Benz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Mercedes-Benz Forum > General Mercedes-Benz Forums > Off-Topic

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Mercedes-Benz Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











  • Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
     
    Thread Tools
    Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
    Email this Page Email this Page
    Display Modes
    Linear Mode Linear Mode



    Posting Rules  
    You may post new threads
    You may post replies
    You may not post attachments
    You may not edit your posts

    BB code is On
    Smilies are On
    [IMG] code is On
    HTML code is Off
    Trackbacks are On
    Pingbacks are On
    Refbacks are On

     

    Title goes here

    close
    video goes here
    description goes here. Read Full Story
    For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome