Outcome Grim at Oil War Game - Mercedes-Benz Forum

 
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post #1 of 2 (permalink) Old 06-27-2005, 03:07 PM Thread Starter
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Outcome Grim at Oil War Game

Former Officials Fail to Prevent Recession in Mock Energy Crisis

By John Mintz
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, June 24, 2005; Page A19

The United States would be all but powerless to protect the American economy in the face of a catastrophic disruption of oil markets, high-level participants in a war game concluded yesterday.

The exercise, called "Oil Shockwave" and played out in a Washington hotel ballroom, had real-life former top U.S. officials taking on the role of members of the president's Cabinet convening to respond to escalating energy crises, culminating in $5.32-a-gallon gasoline and a world wobbling into recession.

Former CIA director R. James Woolsey and former EPA administrator Carol Browner said the United States needs to reduce dependence on overseas oil. (Michael Williamson - The Washington Post)

"The American people are going to pay a terrible price for not having had an energy strategy," said former CIA director Robert M. Gates, who took on the role of national security adviser. Stepping out of character, he added that "the scenarios portrayed were absolutely not alarmist; they're realistic."

The exercise began with ethnic unrest in Nigeria, leading to the collapse of the oil industry in that west African nation. Then al Qaeda launched crippling attacks on key energy facilities in Valdez, Alaska, and Saudi Arabia.

But the war game's participants -- including former CIA director R. James Woolsey, former Marine Corps commandant Gen. P.X. Kelley and former EPA administrator Carol Browner, soon realized the U.S. government had few options in the short term to prevent an economic crash in this country and worldwide.

When the exercise's planners first met last year, oil was in the $40-a-barrel range. As they fantasized where oil prices would be for the war game's start in an imagined late 2005, they said, they set them at $58 but worried they were being absurdly pessimistic. Yesterday, the closing price for a barrel of oil was $59.42.

The war game players also referred several times to other real-life events of today. A major feature of the exercise was how China's voracious appetite for oil is driving up world prices, and only yesterday it was announced the Beijing government, in a bold and unprecedented act, is bidding to buy the U.S. oil company Unocal.

The exercise was organized by two nonprofit groups that focus on the national security implications of U.S. dependence on foreign oil: the National Commission on Energy Policy and Securing America's Future Energy (SAFE). The scenarios were dreamed up by a team of former oil industry executives and government officials, including Rand Beers, a White House counterterrorism official who quit in 2003 to protest the Iraq war.

The underlying situation dramatized in the exercise -- and accepted by most energy analysts -- is that tolerances are so tight between supply and demand, that even small disruptions in the delivery of oil and natural gas can cause cascades of unpleasant developments.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...062301896.html

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post #2 of 2 (permalink) Old 06-27-2005, 11:59 PM
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RE: Outcome Grim at Oil War Game

This is exactly why I think we should keep separate the disparate issues of energy security and military security. Viewed properly, energy security should receive the lion's share of our current misguided "defense" budget, and military security should be relegated to real (few) threats to our nation's borders, airspace and territorial waters. We've dropped the ball on energy security ever since the early seventies when we experienced our first oil embargo at the hands of foreign nations in far off lands. At that time we should've recognized that our energy security required a national commitment to energy independence and innovation. Now we feign shock and awe that folks abroad don't like it when we play fast and loose with their sovereign natural resources.
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